Narikala Fortess in old Tbilisi

Posted By : Georgian Tour/ 51

Narikala fortess-  also called the Mother Fortress of Tbilisi, Narikala is an ancient symbol of Tbilisi’s defence. The fortress was established in the 4th century, around the period when the city itself was founded. It was then known as Shuris-tsikhe (Invidious Fort). The name Narikala is said to derive from a Persian word for citadel, but another theory says was the name that Mongols used, meaning “little fortress”. It was expanded considerably by the Arabs during the 7th and 8th centuries. The Arabs built the Emir’s palace within its walls. King David further extended the Builder the fortress in th 11th century. Most of the existing fortifications date from the 16th and 17th centuries. In 1827 it was damaged by an earthquake and was not resorted. St. Nikolos church, inside the fortress walls, dates from the 12th century. It was renovated in 1996. Narikala offers you some of the best panoramas of the city.

We’d also advise you to take a walk along the Narikala Tourist route, a 1500 metre trail that runs from the top of the ridge near the Mother Georgia statue, around the fortress and down into Old Town to near the entrance to the Botanical Gardens. It offers stunning views at every turn and is a particular delight at night when the city lights shine below.

 

source: www.inyourpocket.com

Taste Of Georgia: Ajara, Samegrelo, Svaneti

Posted By : Georgian Tour/ 102

Going to Georgia, travelers usually prepare themselves to enjoy khachapuri, lobio, khinkali and, of course, a variety of meat barbecues, which are called “mtsvadi” in Georgian. Advanced experts in Georgian cuisine leave some free space in the stomach for pkhali, eggplants in walnut sauce, chakhokhbili and kharcho. However, our compact country has such a rich variety of regional dishes, that even if you decide to try one new for breakfast, lunch and dinner, you will need more than several weeks to explore the whole treasury.

Let’s take a little journey through the regions of Georgia and see what they can offer!

Starting with the West Coast… Well, Ajarian cuisine can really be described as “cheese rolling in butter”. Locals prepare very tasty and high-calorie meals. One of them is sinori, gentle rolls made of thin dough baked with matsoni/yoghurt and butter. Sinori can be eaten for breakfast – especially if you days is promising to be busy – or for a heavy family dinner.

Another calorie bomb from Ajara is called borano. It is made of Adjarian cheese melted in butter. Be prepared: it will be difficult to leave the table after you are finished!

Samegrelo, another Western Black Sea region of Georgia, is famous for the fact that its inhabitants prefer very spicy food. Megrelian adjika sauce is so sharp that Chuck Norris himself would probably cry, having tried it. If we talk about dishes, the most significant for the region are gebzhalia and elarji. Elarji is polenta brewed from corn flour  with suluguni cheese inside. This heavy delicious dish should served hot!

Gebzhalia is a starter, delicate rolls with fresh cheese and mint in matsoni/yogurt sauce. It just melts inside your mouth, and is contrasting to those extremely spicy dishes and sauces that are served after.

From Samegrelo it is logical to climb higher into the mountains – to Upper Svaneti. This fabulously beautiful region with harsh living conditions is famous first of all for its special seasoning – Svan salt. Common salt is mixed with local spices in a special wooden mortar, and thus turns into slightly moist flavorful spice that can be used with salads, as well as with meat and fish.

Typical Svanetian pastry is kubdari, a tortilla stuffed with meat. In such difficult living conditions as there, meat filling is an excellent source of calories, and tortilla format is a convenient option for takeaway eating. The shepherds take kubdari as they travel to pastures, and eat them during a long time there.

Another traditional Svan pastry is chishdvari (down the mountains, in the rest of Georgia it is called “chvishtari”). It is made from corn flour, and keeps a piece of suluguni cheese inside. Chishdvari is especially tasty, as it’s taken just from a pan, and you eat it looking at the highest peaks of Georgia – let’s say, Shkhara – and breathe fresh air at an altitude of over 2,000 meters.

The first part of our culinary journey through the regions of Georgia is about to end now. Nevertheless, there is still a lot of interesting stuff for you! Stay tuned with Georgia and Travel!

 

Source: Georgia.travel

Mtirala: Georgian nature at its purest

Posted By : Georgian Tour/ 76

It is pure, unblemished nature…

Yet the Mtirala National Park can be found just 40 kilometres from Batumi, the capital city of Georgia’s autonomous republic of Adjara.

“We’re lucky to have the sunshine: this Adjarian national park, Mtirala, is considered Georgia’s rainiest spot of land,” said Euronews reporter Denis Loctier, as he explored the region.

In this high humidity, the air is fresh and fragrant with blooming flowers and herbs.

It’s a protected site for the region’s flora and fauna, including rare and endangered endemic species.

“Mtirala translates as ‘a weeping mountain’. This place is often clouded in mist and drizzle. That’s where the name comes from,” explained park guide, Zia Kontselidze.

At 1,500 metres above sea level, Mtirala’s trails are perfect for hiking, bird watching and adventure tours.

 

Source: Euronews.com

Evidence of ancient wine found in Georgia a vintage quaffed some 6,000 years BC

Posted By : Georgian Tour/ 78

Archaeologists are hard at work sifting through the dirt at a dig in Imiri, south-eastern Georgia.

The scientists believe that the site contains artefacts that could once and for all prove that Georgia is the oldest wine producing country in the world.

Eight thousand years ago, during the neolithic era, farming and agriculture were flourishing in the three villages that now make up the Shulaveri – Shumitepe Cultural ruins in Marneuli Valley.

And one of the products being grown and harvested proved to be grapes to make wine.

Stephen Batiuk is from the University of Toronto: “What is significant about this site is that it produced some of the earliest examples of domesticated grapes, which we believe were involved in the earliest production of wine. We know that a wine vessel was discovered in Shulaveri, which also provides evidence of early wine production. But here (Imiri site) wine could be produced even earlier taking wine production in Georgia all the way back to 6,000 BC.”

David Lordkipanidze, is director of Georgia’s National Museum:
“The aim of this project is to look at the history of agriculture. It’s not just only the question of the earliest wine and we have found here traces of very old wine making, but as well to look at the domestication of the weeds, of the different agricultural products, which shows that Caucasus and Georgia were part of this big geographical territory, the so called Fertile Crescent, where the earliest agriculture was appearing and first civilisations were spreading.”

The Fertile Crescent is a swathe of land stretching from upper Egypt to Mesopotamia, modern day Iraq, Kuwait and northeast Syria.

 

Source: Euronews.com

Tourists speak about Georgian wine at the Georgian Wine Festival 2018

Posted By : Georgian Tour/ 74

Georgian Wine Festival 2018 has been going on for several hours already on the Shardeni Street in Tbilisi. Locals and tourists attend the event and are tasting products represented there.

What tourists say about Georgia

Tourists say that Georgian wine is distinguished with its diverse taste and is one of the best gifts they will take to their countries.
“I guess it is a wine holiday. I like Georgian wine very much and due to diverse taste of it, anyone can find their favourite wine. My favourite wine is Kindzmarauli. I have tried Kisi for the first time here and enjoyed it very much. All of my friends in Russia wait that I will take there a bottle of wine on the way back. I think wine is the best Georgian gift” – says one of the Russian tourists Irina Slavyeva.

“I turned up here accidentally and I am excited. I have tried Kindzmarauli, Saperavi and Mukuzani. My favourite one is Kindzmarauli for now. Today we fly back to Moscow and we have already defined weight of our luggage, but I will by several bottles though. In Moscow they enjoy Georgian wine very much. All of my friends asked me to take some wine for them” – says another Russian tourist Iulia Bistretskaya.
One of the guests Violeta Sharvashidze says that this kind of festival is very important in terms of tourism.

“I knew Wine Festival would be hold here so I arrived with my friends and all of us are very satisfied. I have tried different types of wine, but enjoyed Mtsvane Manavi by Batono Company very much. Generally, wines represented at the festival are very tasty. Ensembles sing perfectly well. We are staying here for the whole day and let’s see what else will be performed. Such festivals are very pleasant to the locals” – says Violeta Sharvashidze.
Actors from the Motion Theatre hold costume performance at the moment.

Georgian Wine Festival 2018 was opened by minister of Environment and Natural Resources Protection of Georgia Levan Davitashvili. Festival will finish at 7 pm today.
Partners of the event are Motion Theatre, The Folklore State Centre of Georgia and ART Shok Company.
Media supporters of the event are TV PalitraNews, Palitra Radio, ambebi.ge, events.ambebi.ge, ipn.ge, kvirispalitra, georgianjournal.ge, allnews.ge, reitingi.ge.
Source: Georgianjournal.ge

Georgian Adventures: Okatse Canyon

Posted By : Georgian Tour/ 79

Georgian adventures continue at the Okatse Canyon near the village of Gordi in the country’s west.

“This area close to Kutaisi is famous for its deep canyons, forest lakes and other fascinating natural attractions,” said Euronews reporter Denis Loctier, trying out a new footpath with vertiginous views.

The 800 metre footpath is visited by 150,000 tourists a year and there are plans to boost the experience further by making its floor transparent!

“The thrill of walking over the canyon attracts many visitors,” Okatse Canyon Director Zaza Gagua told us.

“This is the only place in Georgia where you can really feel this, so it’s not often that people are so frightened that they turn back!”

And if you’re a true adrenaline junkie, you can test yourself by rappelling down Kinchkha, one of Georgia’s tallest waterfalls, with its refreshing cascade of clear mountain water.

 

source: Euronews.com

10 Reasons why you should visit Georgia

Posted By : Georgian Tour/ 72
Cradle of Wine – It has been archaeologically proven that the roots of Georgian viticulture are between 9000 and 7000 BC.

A unique Alphabet – There are just 14 independent alphabets in the world and Georgian is one of them.

UNESCO heritage sites – Our current UNESCO heritage sites include the ancient capital city of Mtskheta, the massive cathedral complexes of Bagrati and Gelati, and the mountain region of Svaneti.

Europe’s highest settlement in Georgia – Ushguli is recognized as the highest settlement in Europe, set the altitudes between 2086 and 2200 meters above sea level.

First European civilization – Recent excavations of Dmanisi have revealed and extraordinary record of the earliest homonid dispersal beyond Africa (1,75 million years ago)

Flora and Fauna – Georgia is one of the most ecologically diverse countries in the world, with climatic zones ranging from  subtropical to high alpine to semi- desert. Bears, lynxes and even leopards can be found in Georgia’s dense forests of Caucasian fir-the tallest trees in Europe.

Endless tourism possibilities – From adventure tourism to discovering the art of wine making, Georgia has something to delight every visitor.

Summer sea and winter ski resorts – In Georgia, you can swim in the sea as late as November. After that, why not head to the mountains, where there is guaranteed snow until late April, making Georgia a top destination for skiers and snowboarders.

Mountains and trekking – Access to peaks like Mount Shkhara (5201 Meters) and mount Ushba (4710 meters) and opportunities to stay with Svan families in villages make trekking in this region an outdoor and cultural adventure.

Rapid development – The New York Times ranked Georgia 6-th among 52 best countries for the tourism destination. Tbilisi has become one of the safest capitals in the Western World comparable to Lisbon or Vienna.

 

Georgian Adventures: Pedal power in Batumi

Posted By : Georgian Tour/ 77

n this episode of Georgian adventures, we jump on one of the hire bikes in Batumi, the booming capital of the Autonomous Republic of Adjara.

“Batumi is one of Georgia’s largest cities and its best known Black Sea resort,” said our reporter Denis Loctier as he peddled along the promenade.

“This coastline boulevard is Batumi’s most famous attraction!”

What originated in the late 19th century as a seaside boardwalk is now a lush seven-kilometre park promenade with dancing fountains, modern sculptures, beach bars and cafés. It is a great place for a leisurely stroll and, even better, for a scenic two-wheel ride.

Pedal-friendly whatever the weather, Batumi is stunning for bike-lovers when the sun shines!

“A bicycle is a very convenient way to see the main attractions of Batumi,” said local student and cycling enthusiast Maia Japaridze.

“It’s not a very big city. You could walk across it in a day and if you get a bike you can get around Batumi very quickly.”

The city is lined with bicycle lanes, offering picturesque views and a refreshing breeze to those who prefer their seaside vacation in the saddle!

 

Source: Euronews.com

Georgian Adventures: Georgia is also a place to ski!

Posted By : Georgian Tour/ 64

In our Georgian adventures, the sky is the limit as we discover the country’s most popular destination for ski holidays!

“The Greater Caucasus is Europe’s highest mountain range and this is where we find Georgia’s best known ski resort – Gudauri,” declared our intrepid reporter Denis Loctier as he paraglided into the zone, with an instructor.

The slopes in Gudauri reach an altitude of 3,300 metres above sea level, so the skiing season begins in early December and lasts until the end of April.

The resort is famous for its snow quality and skiing infrastructure — the most developed in Georgia.

“Gudauri is the largest ski resort in our country and the closest to the capital,” said one enthusiastic skier, Nino Tkavadze.

“I think it has huge potential with the diversity of mountains around here!”

Accessible from Tbilisi in less than two hours, Gudauri offers 70 kilometres of ski runs, unlimited off-piste opportunities and a choice of extreme adventures like heli-skiing and speed riding.

 

Source: Euronews.com

Prometheus, Sataplia and Kumistavi: Aladdin’s caves in Georgia

Posted By : Georgian Tour/ 70

Kumistavi caves near Kutaisi in western Georgia is the biggest and most amazing network of caverns in the country.

The little sister of this huge complex is Sataplia cave. Nearby, there are dinosaurs’ footprints!

But the main jewel is the Prometheus cave, with its breathtaking views of stalactites, stalagmites and underground rivers.

“We are in a spectacular spot here, at the heart of a labyrinth of caverns branching out for dozens of kilometres underground,” said ‘Postcards’ reporter Claudio Rosmino.

“Just think, some of these rocks have taken up to 60 million years to form!”

Today, visitors to the Prometheus Cave Centre can enjoy a magnificent 1.2 km walk, but those who discovered this place, in 1984, reached it through a very narrow passage.

“We were literally in the mud up to our ears! When we arrived in this huge hall, this amazing underground system, we were bursting with happiness,” remembered speleologist Amiran Jamrishvili.

“We could not wait to go out and share this with all the other speleologists!”

And no visit would be complete without a boat trip on an underground river in which the traveller can emerge from the magical cave – back into the outside world.

 

Source:Euronews.com