History

Why is Saperavi a unique variety of vine and is it only found in Georgia?

Posted By : Georgian Tour/ 344

Georgia is one of the main hubs for forming various classical vines. An important book called, “Georgian Amphelography”, was published in 1960, where Georgian grape varieties were discussed. The complete amphelographic included a description of 57 standard and perspective varieties. The book contains in total 525 varieties of vines.

After final verification, 414 varieties of Georgian vine description were included in the amphelographic book.

Among them is Saperavi, a unique grape variety that originates in Georgia. Biological features and morphological signs of this breed identify Saperavi as the oldest breed. None of the Georgian varieties have the same number of additional names as Saperavi. This can be explained by the fact that Saperavi is an old breed. The most famous and varied types of Saperavi are Budeshuri, Otskhanuri Sapere, Meskhi Saperavi, Ateni Saperavi, Saperavi Pachkha, and many more.

Information about the time and place of the origin of Saperavi have not been preserved, but based on different data it can be determined by approximation. According to Ivane Javakhishvili, primarily the Saperavi vine originated in the old Georgian province of Shavshet-klarjeti, from which it then spread to Eastern Georgia via Kartli (discovered seeds in Uplistsikhe and Samtavro, dated around 9th-10th Century and also patterns on old cellars in Kaspi).This took place in the vineyards of Kakheti by the end of the 17th century.

The growing of the Saperavi vines spread from Georgia to almost all neighbouring countries: Azerbaidjan – from Saingilo, mostly in the regions such as Kakhi, Zakatala, Shamkori, Ghanja; Armenia – in the districts of Alaverdi, Shamshadin and Ijevani. However, the Saperavi vine is less common in Armenia. Since 1927, Saperavi cultivation has been extensive in the former Soviet farm at Ararat. Saperavi was introduced in Dagestan from the region of Kakheti, mostly in the districts of Darubandi and Makhachkala.

In the Middle Asian countries Saperavi was brought together with European varieties by 1860, and in France it is fetched by French habitant of Kutaiasi Longale, who was sending Georgian breeds to ampheliographist Pule.

The reason why Saperavi is widely grown and cultivated in different countries is down to its high agricultural and technological properties (productivity, quality, frost-resistant). According to the chemical analysis, Saperavi belongs to a saint wine vines’ group. It is among the world’s best red wines. The high quality of Saperavi Wine is often acknowledged by official tasting commissions. Director of Nikitin Garden, Hartvis, G. Tsabel and others give it a high rating. The prominent French amphelographist Odari wrote: “Everything gives me the right to think that Saperavi is the best of all grapes to make red wine.”

The best Saperavi wine is made from grapes, harvested in the middle of the Kakheti region, especially in Kvareli and Mukuzani. These are truly the pride of Georgian wine. The most popular wines made from Saperavi grapes are “Saperavi”, “Kindzmarauli”, “Kvareli”, and “Mukuzani. The best dessert wines from Saperavi grapes are seen in the Crimea and Uzbekistan. In some places the wine is a dark ruby-colour, a pomegranate colour, or can even be a blackcurrant colour. But in every case it is accompanied with a strong flavor and a harmonious sensation of its components. According to the Ukrainian winemaker, Okhremenko, the “softness of the wine is integral with the the character of wine its originality and integrity.”

Source: www.allwine.ge

Georgian alphabet in the metro of Frankfurt

Posted By : Georgian Tour/ 389

Frankfurt U-Bahn has been decorated with the posters of Georgian alphabet. The posters are the reminder of the fact that Georgia is the honorary country of Frankfurt Book Fair 2018. Every year, the fair chooses a country as guest of honour.

The chosen country has a chance to introduce all its cultural and intellectual treasure to the international audience. The honourary country has a special opportunity of putting out its works through the major theatres, concert halls, galleries, cinemas, libraries and

Georgia decided to represent the country through the characters of Georgian alphabet at the fair. The concept of the project is “Georgia made by characters”. Cultural events of 72 Georgian writers and German translations of about 200 Georgian literary works will also be represented at the fair.

The beauty and uniqueness of the Georgian alphabet are recognized all over the world. Georgian scripts are among the only 14 existing scripts worldwide. Georgian scripts include three writing systems: Asomtavruli, Nuskhuri and Mkhedruli. The three systems show three levels of development of the Georgian alphabet. It is worth to admit that today all of them are still in use. The third system – Mkhedruli or designated for wider society is used as a literary language. The first two are used in church services – all of the books used in church and liturgy are written with the Nuskhuri and Asomtavruli script. Although the systems differ in appearance, all three are written in the lower case (in other words no capital letters are used).

Their letters share the same names and alphabetical order and are written horizontally from left to right. Mkhedruli is now the standard script of modern Georgian. The Georgian alphabet was announced as one of the world’s most beautiful scripts by www.matadornetwork.com (a collection of millions of travelers across the globe with an unquenchable thirst for adventure and exploration).

The fair is going to commence on the 9th of October.

Georgian guda cheese wins first place at cheese festival in Italy

Posted By : Georgian Tour/ 444

Traditional cheese made in Georgia’s historical region of Tusheti has become the winner of the International Cheese Festival in Italy.

A Tushuri ‘guda’ cheese, made by young Georgian farmer Kakha Abuladze, 22, came in first place at the Festival.

Tushuri guda is a cheese produced from sheep’s milk that ripens in a “guda” (the Georgian word for a bag made from the skin of a sheep, goat, or calf)..

Since 2011, Slow Food has awarded shepherds and craftsmen who reject shortcuts and continue to produce cheese and other food products while preserving naturalness, traditions, and flavors.

Shepherds and chefs who produce cheese and other organic products according to traditions were awarded as well.

The other winners of the four-day festival were farmers from the United States, Italy, and the Cape Verde Republic.

The international cheese festival in Italy is held once every two years and gathers hundreds of farmers from all over the world.

Opening ceremony of Georgian Fine Arts Museum

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Tbilisi Mayor Kakha Kaladze attended the opening ceremony of Georgian Fine Arts Museum and addressed the gathered community.

According to Kakha Kaladze, the City Hall will always support similar projects.

“As the mayor of the capital, I would like to once more reiterate, that the capital of any European country would dream of such space and the environment. Younger generations will also be able to develop and I am really happy in this regard. I would like to thank to Gia Jokhtaberidze and his family for everything, “said Kakha Kaladze.

The private collection of the museum founders, Gia Jokhtaberidze and Manana Shevardnadze’s family paintings were exhibited in the museum, which has been composed of 3500 paintings of 80 artists since 1945.

Exhibition space is relevant to modern standards. Gradually, new paintings will be added to the museum and besides permanent exposition, temporary exhibitions will be arranged as well.

The event was attended by members of the Government of Georgia, representatives of diplomatic corps, artists and representatives of world leading museums.

Tbilisi Marathon

Posted By : Georgian Tour/ 620

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Tbilisimarathon is the biggest sports event in Georgia.
Timing and results of participants will be calculated according to the international standards, supervised by Dutch Company “MyLaps”.
MyLaps is one of the biggest companies operating in different kind of sport events such as : Olympic games, Boston Marathon, Ironman and etc.
Tbilisimarathon is charity event, funds from your registration fees will be doubled by Heidelberg and transferred to non-profit organization “First Step Georgia” which has been working with special needs children, teenagers and their parents for over 20 years.
Date: September 30.
Place: Tbilisi City Center.
Race:
Half Marathon (21.1 km) – 20 ₾
10 km Race – 15 ₾
Kids’ Run – free
1km run for 11-15 year old youngsters.
   500 m for 5-11 year old children.

Tbilisi

Cheese Festival

Posted By : Georgian Tour/ 480

Every year Georgia invites gourmets from all over the world to the Cheese Festival. In 2015 it became international, as Armenia and Azerbaijan filled the list of participants, which means you can enjoy even more varieties of this loved-by-all food. Moreover, it was decided to hold the next festival in the region that wins the competition. Previously, a celebration of the senses had been hosted by the Rike Park in Tbilisi.

The name makes the purpose of the event obvious – to introduce visitors to the regional types of cheeses. Hard flavorful dambal-khacho prepared according to technology which is recognized and protected by UNESCO, spicy Guda cheese matured in a bag made of sheepskin, Tenili Kveli from Southern Georgia, tightly woven into a braid, cheese in honey, oils, flowers, spices, and even wine! Please, come hungry to Georgia festivals to feel the rich taste of all this awesomeness!

Peasants from different regions enjoy showing the ancient tools used for preparing cheeses and tell visitors about specific details of preparation of different sorts of cheeses.

If you appreciate the culture of cheese making and huge variety of cheeses to taste, welcome to Georgia!

Wine Festival in Tbilisi

Posted By : Georgian Tour/ 412

In the last several years month of May in Tbilisi feels great not just because of blooming nature and splendid weather, but also because the New Wine Festival is held in the city. End of spring is the time to unseal huge clay vessels called qvevri, filled with pressed grapes and buried under the ground according to the traditional Georgian winemaking technology. The young wine is ready and waits for the moment when wine lovers come to taste it.

Usually the festival is held in one of green areas in Tbilisi in the beginning of May. Travellers, bloggers, journalists, winemakers and sommeliers from all around the globe enjoy tasting more than 60 varieties of excellent Georgian wine of the last harvest. Traditional Georgian barbeques and fresh bread are available at the festival to try keeping you sober. Accompanied by Georgian dances and songs performances, the festival lasts the whole weekend. Outdoors, under the warm May sun the wine tastes gorgeous!

THE FLOWER FESTIVAL IN TBILISI

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The festival coincides with the Independence Day celebration (26 May) and is held in Sioni square and Shardeni Street in the Old Town. The streets are filled with beautiful flower displays.

Independence Day in Georgia 2019

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This holiday is celebrated annually on 26 May.

Also known as Day of the First Republic, this is Georgia’s national day. It marks the adoption of the Act of Independence in 1918.

History of Georgian Independence Day

 

Georgia had been part of the Russian Empire since 1800. Following the Russian revolution and the defeats in the First World War, movements within Georgia pushed for independence from Russia and on 26 May 1918, Georgia declared itself an independent democratic republic.

26 May had been celebrated as a public holiday until Georgia became part of the Soviet Union in 1922. Celebrations of regional public holidays were suppressed across the Soviet Union and it wasn’t until 1991, with the collapse of the Soviet regime that this day regained its public holiday status.

Georgia seceded from the Soviet Union on 9 April 1991 and 9 April is now celebrated as a national public holiday, the Day of National Unity.

New Year’s traditions in Georgia

Posted By : Georgian Tour/ 895

In Georgia, Europe and Asia have merged into a culture that is strangely not European nor Asian, but distinctly its own: Georgian. The mix of influences from the two continents has resulted in unique local traditions, cuisine, customs, and more that are unlike what you’ll find anywhere else — including how the locals ring in the new year.

If you want to have an authentic local experience in Tbilisi in December, touristy Rustaveli Avenue and Liberty Square are not the right places for that. Instead, visit Aghmashenebeli Avenue and the bazaar. Georgian bazaars are joyful and full of colours, and in the days leading up to December 31st, the bazaars are the most-visited places in the city as locals stock up on the goods they’ll need for New Year’s celebrations. While there are plenty of dishes, the highlight for locals is gozinaki, a sweet, homemade candy made from honey and walnuts — a New Year’s without this treat is simply unimaginable in Georgia. (Plus, it’ll keep the dentists in business for the new year!)

Another tradition is the tree: in Georgia, it isn’t just a Christmas tree that gets put up at the holiday, but a New Year tree, called a chichilaki. Traditional New Year trees are made from

shaved walnut or hazelnut tree branches, and then decorated with chocolates and fruit. These fluffy, lovely, handmade trees are believed to bring happiness and peace to your home. The sizes vary from several centimetres to a few metres, but don’t worry, the size of your tree doesn’t affect the amount of happiness or peace you’ll experience.

Generally, a chichilaki will stand in the living room, right next to the dinner table, so it can join you for a glass of heavenly Georgian wine at dinner. Kidding, trees don’t drink — but you do, right? If so, Tbilisi is the right place for you. Here, good wine is always a good idea, and we like to think that maybe wine is the answer to why Georgians are so artistic; the streets of Tbilisi are filed with local artists selling crafts. Head to Agmashenebeli Avenue, where you’re likely to find some amazing handcrafted wooden souvenirs. (You might also find farmers selling huge pumpkins from their fields, right there in the city centre.)

Between your New Year’s Eve supply shopping at the bazaar and your souvenir shopping on the streets, be sure to grab a local lunch to fuel you up. The streets of Tbilisi are full of nice cafés that offer khachapuri (cheese-filled bread), spinach pie, and other pastries, as well as plenty of street food.

Late in the day on December 31, when you’ve had enough good wine, nice art, and delicious food for the daylight hours, head back to your hotel to change and rush out to a New Year’s Eve party — where I’m sure you’ll find all those things (wine, art, and food!) in abundance!

Here is incredible tour in Georgia on New Year time: